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Full text of "Report on the Honolulu record"

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/ REPORT ON 

THE HONOLULU 



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RECORD 




OCTOBER 1, 1950 



Prepared and released by the 



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Committee on Un-American Activities, U. S. House of Representatives 

Washington, D. C. 



PUBLIC 



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Committee on Un-American Activities, United States House of 

Representatives 

eighty-first congress, second session 



John S. Wood, Georgia, Chairman 

Francis E. Walter, Pennsylvania 
Burr P, Harrison, Virginia 
John McSweeney, Ohio 
Morgan M. Moulder, Missouri 
Richard M, Nixon, California 
Francis Case, South Dakota 
Harold H, Velde, Illinois 
Bernard W. Kearney, New York 



Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., Cownsel 

Louis J. Russell, Senior Investigator 

John W. Carrington, Clerk of Committee 

Benjamin Mandel, Director of Research 



II 



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REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 

The Committee on Un-American Activities, after an investigation 
and analysis of the Honolulu Record, owned and published by the 
Honolulu Record Publishing Co., Ltd., hereby submits this report con- 
cerning the publication to the House of Representatives. 

Ownership 

The Articles of Association of the Honolulu Record Publishing Co., 
Ltd. (exhibit No. 1),^ filed with the office of the treasurer, Territory of 
Hawaii, on August 27, 1948, reflect that the Honolulu Record Publish- 
ing Co., Ltd., was officially incorporated on that date, with the first 
officers and directors of the organization as follows : 

President — Koji Ariyoshi 

Vice president — Lewis K. Yogi 

Secretary — Cyril Bristow 

Treasurer — Adrian Palomino 

Director — Nobuyuki Matsuzaki 

The amount of $50,000, to be divided into 10,000 shares of common 
stock at a par value of $5 per share, was set forth as the authorized 
capital of said corporation. 

The affidavit of officers (exhibit No. 2),^ filed with the treasurer's 
office. Territory of Hawaii, on August 26, 1948, discloses that 7,881 of 
the 10,000 shares of stock were subscribed to. This same exhibit re- 
flects that only 1.007 shares of the subscribed common stock were ever 
paid for (a total sum of $5,035). The unpaid subscribed stock, 
amounting to 6,874 shares, is in the name of Koji Ariyoshi. Thus, this 
exhibit discloses that the Honolulu Record Publishing Co. began its 
operations with total cash assets of $5,035. 

On the annual corporation exhibit (exhibit No. 3),^ filed by the Ho- 
nolulu Record Publishing Co., Ltd., for the period August 26, 1948, 
through August 31, 1949, it is significant to note that at the end of the 
first year of operation, it could show an increase of 353 paid-up shares 
of stock (value, $1,765). Paid-up stock in the corporation then 
amounted to $6,800. 

The annual corporation exhibit also reflects a net operating loss for 
the first year of $2,351.91. This exhibit further discloses that the total 
net worth of the Honolulu Record Publishing Co., Ltd., as of August 
31, 1949, was $4,548.09. 

Out of a total of 8,133 subscribed shares of stock, valued at $40,665, 
the exhibit reveals that 7,500 shares, worth $37,500, were subscribed 
to by Koji Ariyoshi, editor of the Honolulu Record and president of 
the Honolulu Record Publishing Co., Ltd. However, this exhibit re- 
flects that the total amount actually invested by Ariyoshi is $3,635, or 

' See appendix, pp. 13-20. 
^ See appendix, pp. 21-2.S. 
' See appendix, pp. 24-29. 



2 REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 

727 shares purchased and paid for by him. He is indebted to the Ho- 
nolulu Record Publishing Co., Ltd., in the amount of $33,865, covering 
6,773 shares of common stock as subscribed to by him. 

Ariyoshi's present position as editor of the Honolulu Record fits in 
well with his background. He is probably one of the best qualified 
persons in Hawaii to propagandize the Communist Party line through 
the medium of the press. 

Koji Ariyoshi was born on January 30, 1914, at Koma, T. H. He 
attended the University of Hawaii from 1937 to 1940, and the Uni- 
versity of Georgia during the 1940-41 term, where he received his 
bachelor's degree in journalism. He enlisted in the United States 
Army at Manzanar Relocation Center on November 30, 1942. In 
January 1944 he departed for the China-Burma-India theater where 
he was assigned to psychological warfare work. He was commissioned 
a second lieutenant in June of 1945 and remained in the same type 
of work until January 5, 1946, when his request to be discharged in 
China was granted. Subsequent to his discharge, he became employed 
with the OWI as a field representative. 

Ariyoshi's reaction concerning his experiences in Communist China 
are somewhat reflected in an article appearing under his name in the 
February 1947 issue of Spotlight on the Far East, published by the 
Committee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy, which has been 
cited as Communist by Attorney General Tom C. Clark. In this issue 
he wrote a guest column in support of the Chinese Communists. The 
March and June 1949 issues of Far East Spotlight, successor to 
Spotlight on the Far East, lists Ariyoshi as a consultant to the Com- 
mittee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy. This magazine has 
consistently supported the Chinese Communists. 

The Hawaii Star of April 23, 1948, reflects that a progress report 
on the New York Chapter of the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee 
was made by Koji Ariyoshi, one of the founders of this chapter, at 
an HCLC meeting in Honolulu on April 20, 1948. The HCLC was 
cited as being Communist by the Attorney General of the United 
States on April 28, 1949. The HCLC was also cited as— 

a subversive organization initiated and operated by Communists for the sole 
purpose of expanding the influence of the small Communist minority in the 
Territory of Hawaii — 

by the Committee on Un-American Activities in a report to the House 
of Representatives on June 23, 1950 (made H. Rept. 2986, August 24, 
1950). 

In view of the foregoing, it is not surprising to find that Ariyoshi 
uses the Honolulu Record to promote the Chinese Communists and 
the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee. 

Listed in the annual corporation exhibit (exhibit No. 3)* as a 
member of the board of directors of the Honolulu Record Publishing 
Co., Ltd., and holder of seven shares of stock is Adele Kensinger, re- 
siding at 1658 Piikoi Street, Honolulu. During the hearings of the 
subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities in Hono- 
lulu during April 1950, four individuals identified Adele Kensinger 
as a member of the Communist Party. 

Former Communist Richard Kageyama testified on April 10, 1950, 
that Adele Kensinger was a memoer of the Makiki branch of the 



* See appendix, pp. 24-29. 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 6 

Communist Party. Testimony of Harry Kuhia, Jr., and Donald 
Uesugi, former Conmiunists, on April 12, 1950, also identified Adele 
Kensinger as attending meetings of the Communist Party. On April 
13, 1950, Masao Mori testified that he observed Adele Kensinger at a 
party meeting which he attended. Masao Mori severed connections 
with the Communist Party after receiving a Communist Party card. 

Adele Kensinger appeared as a witness under subpena before the 
subcommittee on April 17, 1950, at which time she refused to either 
deny or affirm testimony concerning her Communist affiliations on 
grounds of self-incrimination. Investigations by the committee re- 
flect that Mrs. Kensinger was a member of the Hawaii Civil Liberties 
Committee and at one time was a member of the organization com- 
mittee of the HCLC when it was headed by Marshall McEuen. 

According to Soviet Russia Today for July 1947 (p. 3), Mrs. 
Kensinger referred to this pro-Soviet publication as her "favorite 
magazine" and described how she secured 100 subscriptions to it. 

She also has contributed byline articles to the Honolulu Record. 
One of interest appears on page 7 of the issue of June 2, 1949, under 
the title, "Pressure for Peace Breaks Through Gags of Reaction." In 
this article Mrs. Kensinger criticized in one instance the action of 
the United States Government in its first refusal to issue to Dr. Hewlett 
Johnson a visa to enter the United States. She said in the article that 
Dr. Johnson, known as the Red Dean of Canterbury, desired to enter 
the country "to speak for peace." She further stated, "The indig- 
nation of the American people altered that decision * * *." 

Mrs. Kensinger's reason for the refusal of the first visa to Dr. 
Johnson is completely erroneous ; however, her views paralleled those 
expressed in the Communist press. According to Government records, 
Dr. Johnson was refused a visa because he was being sponsored in the 
United States by the National Council of American Soviet Friend- 
ship, a subversive and Communist-dominated organization cited by 
both the Attorney General of the United States and the Committee on 
Un-American Activities. "WTien the sponsorship of Dr. Johnson was 
withdrawn by the National Council of Afnerican Soviet Friendship, a 
visa was issued and Dr. Johnson was allowed to enter the United States 
and advance his ideologies in support of communism. 

In the afore-mentioned article Mrs. Kensinger also supports Frederic 
Joliot-Curie, director of France's atomic energy project. However, 
she fails to mention that Curie is a member of the Communist Party. 
He was recently removed from his position as director of the atomic 
energy project in France. 

Howard Fast is also quoted in this article by Mrs. Kensinger as 
writing a factual review of the Peace Conference in Paris. Mr. Fast 
is a pro-Communist writer who was cited for contempt of Congress in 
1946 for refusing to produce records of the Communist-dominated 
front organization known as the Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Com- 
mittee. He was convicted in Federal courts on July 16, 1947, and has 
recently been jailed following a Supreme Court decision upholding his 
conviction. 

It also might be noted in regard to the afore-mentioned Peace Con- 
ference that Paul Robeson there made the infamous remark that the 
American Negro would never support the United States in the event 
of war against Russia. This statement of Mr. Robeson's has since 



4 REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 

been repudiated by responsible Negro leaders throughout the United 
States. 

Cyril Bristow, of 2357-C Palolo Avenue, Honolulu, is listed as 
secretary-treasurer (exhibit No. 3) of the Honolulu Record Publish- 
ing Co., Ltd, The affidavit of officers (exhibit No. 2), dated August 
26, 1948, lists Cyril Bristow as owning six shares in the Honolulu 
Record Publishing Co., Ltd. The annual corporation exhibit (ex- 
hibit No. 3), filed with the treasurer's office. Territory of Hawaii, on 
December 8, 1949, discloses Bristow owns 18 shares of stock, a purchase 
increase of 12 shares since his original purchase as reflected by ex- 
hibit No. 2. 

A souvenir journal of the Labor Canteen, located at 830 Richards 
Street, Honolulu, on the occasion of its formal opening on August 
19, 1945, lists Cyril Bristow as chairman of its publicity committee, 
with his former wife, Elizabeth Bristow, an identified member of the 
Communist Party, as chairman of its temporary committees. 

Among those identified as Communists by former members of the 
Communist Party during the hearings of the Committee on Un-Ameri- 
can Activities in Honolulu were the following 1945 officers of the Labor 
Canteen : Jack Hall, chairman ; Doris Ozaki, secretary ; Elizabeth 
Bristow, chairman of the progress committee; Alice Hyun, finance 
committee; Ah Quon McElrath, finance committee; Ralph Voss- 
brink, finance committee ; and Doris Ozaki, program book. 

The Truth About Communism in Hawaii, a pamphlet written by 
Ichiro Izuka, was entered into the official record of the Committee on 
Un-American Activities during its hearings in Honolulu on April 11, 
1950. Mr. Izuka, on page 29 of this exhibit, refers to the Labor Can- 
teen in the following manner : 

Just as the Communist Party uses workers and their labor organizations to 
cari^y out the program of the Communist Party, so do they use middle class, 
"parlor pinlrs" and so-called liberals and intellectuals. This policy is exemplified 
by the Labor Canteen set up during the war, which in turn gave birth to the 
Hawaii Association for Civic Unity. Fellow Traveler innocents, like Dr. Rade- 
maker, had insisted that it was not the Communist Party but the Labor Canteen 
that gave leadership in HACU. Well, I can only tell you what I know. While 
the Waikiki Group was still in existence, Ralph Vossbrink made an oflBcial, though 
verbal, report to that group. He said that the Executive Board of the Communist 
Party had assigned the Kairauki Group the job of infiltrating into, and giving 
leadership to, the Labor Canteen and HACU. This assignment was made to the 
Kaimuki Group because they had no direct connections with labor unions, and 
were supposed to be intellectuals. 

On January 22, 1946, the Honorable George A. Dondero made the 
following statement in regard to the Labor Canteen : 

The Labor Canteen in Honolulu, which hns been a hotbed of Communist propa- 
ganda among the soldiers stationed in the vicinity, is twlay the headquarters of 
the .so-called Oahu Servicemen's Committee for Speedier Demobilization. The 
head of this canteen is Ewart G. Guinier, a well-known New York Communist, 
fired by the New York Civil Service Commission in June 1942. 

Mr. Bristow is presently married to Esther Bristow, treasurer of 
the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee, a Communist-dominated and 
controlled organization which has been cited as a Communist front by 
the Attorney General of the United States and the Committee on Un- 
American Activities. Mr. Bristow is also a member of the Hawaii 
Civil Liberties Committee. 

The annual corporation exhibit of the Honolulu Record Publishing 
Ca, Ltd. (exhibit No. 3), reflects that Adrian Palomino, 3202 East 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 5 

Manoa Road, Honolulu, is vice president of the publishing company. 
The same exhibit discloses that Adrian Palomino is the owner of 36 
shares of stock in the organization. 

With further reference to Adrian Palomino, the following affidavit 
(exhibit No. 4) was secured from Mr. Ichiro Izuka on June 2, 1950, 
setting forth his knowledge regarding Mr. Palomino's Communist 
activities : 

Affidavit of Ichiro Izuka 

Territory of Hawaii, 

City and County of Honolulu, ss: 

Ichiro Izuka, being first duly sworn on oath, deposes and says : 
That he is a resident of the county of Kauai, Territory of Hawaii, with mailing 
address Post OflBce Box 27, Hanapepe, Kauai, T. H., and is the person of the name 
Ichiro Izuka who testified before the Committee on Un-American Activities of the 
United States House of Representatives, sitting in Honolulu, T. H., on April 10, 
1950, and on later occasions ; 

That from 1938 until about October 20, 1946, aflSant was a member in good stand- 
ing of the Communist Party in the Territory of Hawaii ; that from the time of 
the postwar reactivation of the Communist Pai-ty in the Territory of Hawaii in 
November 1945, until affiant left the Communist Party about October 20, 1946, 
affiant was a member of and served as treasurer of the so-called Miscellaneous 
Group of the Communist Party in Honolulu ; that Ralph Vossbrink was also a 
member of that group and also held the office of literatui-e director thereof ; 

That at a date which affiant believes to have been in the first half of 1946, 
affiant attended a meeting of said Miscellaneous Group at the home of Elizabeth 
Bristow in the Waikiki section of Honolulu, and affiant recalls that among other 
Communist Party members of the group present at the same meeting were Ralph 
A'ossbrink, Jack W. Hall, Robert McElrath, Koichi Imori, Ralph Tokunaga, Ernest 
Arena, and Elizabeth Bristow ; that at said meeting among other matters con- 
sidered was an oral report made by Ralph Vossbrink, which report affiant recalls 
to have been substantially as follows : 

That Vossbrink knew a man by the name of Adrian Palomino and knew the 

latter to be a member of the Communist Party ; that Palomino was or had 

been a member of the United States armed forces, and would therefore be 

entitled to the loan guarantee privileges of the so-called GI bill of rights 

should he desire to go into business for himself ; that Palomino had told 

Vossbrink that he (Palomino) was willing to use his GI loan guarantee 

privilege to finance the establishment in Honolulu of a "progressive book 

shop" ; and, that Palomino planned that such book shop would sell Marxist 

and other left-wing literature; 

The said report by Vossbrink was rendered as an official report to a meeting 

of the Miscellaneous Group of the Communist Party and in the course of Voss- 

brink's duties as literature director of the group; that the report was then put 

up for discussion at the meeting ; that the sentiment of all those present at the 

meeting was that Palomino's proposed plan was definitely in the best interests of 

the Communist Party and that he should be encouraged to go through with the 

plan; 

That affiant did not then know Palomino personally and has never met him, 
and knows of no other information that would connect Palomino with Commu- 
nist Party activities or membership ; 

And further affiant sayeth not, except that this affidavit is given at the request 
of the Committee on Un-American Activities of the United States House of 
Representatives. 

Ichiro Izuka. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2d day of June 1950. 
[seal] Lionel P. Camara, 

Notary Public, First Judicial Circuit, Territory of Hawaii. 
My commission expires September 22, 1950. 

Ray Jerome Baker, 911 Kalakana, Honolulu, owns a block of 40 
shares of stock in the Honolulu Record Publishing Co., Ltd. (exhibit 
No. 3), valued at $200. In reviewing Mr. Baker's background, his 
financial support of this publication is easily understandable. 



6 REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 

The Federal Bureau of Investigation identified Ray J. Baker as a 
member of the Communist Party in 1941, when a schematic diagram 
was drawn up by the Honohilu Field Division of the FBI, entitled 
''Communist Activities in the Territory of Hawaii." Said diagram 
was entered as item 32 in the proceeding of the Roberts Report, part 
25, of the hearings before the Joint Committee on the Investigation of 
the Pearl Harbor Attack. It is to be noted in this report that Mr. 
Baker is designated for custodial detention. 

Documentation of Mr, Baker's support of the Communist press will 
be found in the Daily People's World, the Communist Party's official 
newspaper on the Pacific coast, on August 24, 1943 (exhibit No. 5),^ 
wherein he is quoted as follows : 

Congratulations and good wishes for your continued success in getting out an 
A-1 worliing class paper. In these times, the PW is needed more than ever. 

Again, in the issue of Wednesday, February 4, 1948, he states that 
he is a subscriber to the Communist Daily People's World (exhibit 
No. 6).« 

Mr. Baker, in the Sunday Honolulu Advertiser of December 4, 1949, 
under the heading "Letters from the people," criticizes the efforts of 
the Territorial residents in combatting communism. He writes in de- 
fense of "two excellent and needed teachers who lost their 
jobs * * *." The letter in its entirety can be reviewed in the afore- 
mentioned newspaper. The Honolulu Record of February 24, 1949, 
and of September 22, 1949, printed byline articles written by Ray 
Jerome Baker. 

Any remaining doubt of Mr. Baker's Communist convictions should 
be dispelled by a letter which he wrote under date of February 1, 
1947, and which is reproduced as exhibit No. 7 ^ in this report. In 
this letter, it will be noted, Mr. Baker virtually identifies himself as a 
Communist. 

Wo Leong Ho (Wallace Ho), 510 Bush Street, San Francisco, Calif., 
according to the annual corporation exhibit of the Honolulu Record 
Publishing Co., Ltd., (exhibit No. 3), is the owner of 100 shares of 
stock in the Honolulu Record Publishing Co., valued at $500. 

Mr. Ho was identified as a member of the Communist Party during 
the hearings conducted by the subcommittee of the Committee on Un- 
American Activities in Honolulu from April 10 to April 19, 1950. 
Documentation of Mr. Ho's Communist membership will be found in 
the testimony of Mr. Ichiro Izuka during the hearings of the commit- 
tee on April 10, wherein a letter was introduced into the record as 
follows : 

Honolulu, T. H., November 18, 1946. 
Dear Comrade : You are hereby notified that charges have been placed against 
you by the Territorial executive board of the Communist Party of the United 
States of America, for your direct violation of our article 4, section 2, and 
article 9, section 1, of our constitution. 

For the immediate disposal of your case, the trial committee will meet on 
Sunday, November 24, 1946, at 2 p. m., at 62 Laimi Road, Honolulu, T. H. In 
accordance with our constitution you have the fullest rights to appear before this 
committee to defend yourself from any injustice. 
Yours truly, 

Wallace Ho, 
Chairman of the Trial Board. 

= See- appendix, jt. 30. 
" Sep appendix, p. .^1. 
' See appendix, p. ,S2. 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 7 

The afore-mentioned letter was introduced as "Izuka Exhibit 17" 
and appears on page 1419, Hearings Regarding Communist Activities 
in the Territory of Hawaii — Part 1. 

According to the annual corporation exhibit of the Honolulu Record 
Publishing Co., Ltd., Denichi Kimoto, 2126 Makamani Drive, Hono- 
lulu, is in receipt of 106 shares of stock, valued at $530. Mr. Kimoto 
was identified before the subcommittee of the Committee on Un- 
American Activities during the hearings in Hawaii as a member of the 
Communist Party. According to testimony, he attended a Communist 
Party school in California during the middle thirties and was sent to 
Hawaii in 1938 as organizer for the Communist Party. 

The subcommittee produced evidence of Mr. Kimoto's membership 
in the Communist Party in 1937 and 1938, and established that he 
used the party name of Roy Lane during that period. Mr. Kimoto, 
in his appearance before tlie subcommittee on April 18, 1950, refused 
to answer all questions regarding his Communist Party membership 
on groimds of self-incrimination. 

The Honolulu Record, since its inception, has given fayorable 
publicity to the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee, and has printed 
byline articles by the officers of the HCLC. The mutual coopera- 
tion between the HCLC and the Honolulu Record is based on more 
than mutual Communist sympathies. The annual corporation exhibit 
of the Honolulu Record Publishing Co., Ltd., discloses that tlie HCLC 
owns 10 shares of stock, valued at $50, in the publishing company. 
This transaction was thoroughly documented by exhibits introduced 
into the record of the subcommittee of the Comrhittee on LTn-Ameri- 
can Activities during the hearings in Honolulu, and the original can- 
celed check disclosing payment for the stock was entered as an 
exhibit.® 

Additional individuals who own stock in the Honolulu Record and 
who were identified as members of the Communist Party before the 
Committee on LTn-American Activities during the recent hearings 
in Honolulu are: John Ellas, Jr., 165 Sixteenth Street, CHA-3, 
Honolulu, one share; Frank Maehara, 815-C Kanou Street, Honolulu, 
four shares; Doris Ozaki, 933 Seventeenth Street, Honolulu, four 
shares; Eileen Fujimoto, 1526 Kaihee Street, Honolulu, one share. 

The 1949 annual corporation exhibit of the Honolulu Record Pub- 
lishing Co., Ltd., lists Gottfried Seitz, 2357-C Palolo Avenue, Hono- 
lulu, as a member of the board of directors and holder of 5 shares 
of stock of the company. Mr. Seitz was also chairman of the legal 
action committee of the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee in 1949. 

Mr. Seitz, however, has informed the Committee on LTn-American 
Activities that he severed his relations with the Hawaii Civil Liberties 
Committee in May 1949, and also discontinued his connections with 
the Honolulu Record as an officer and stockholder as of September 
1950. 

A breakdown of the ownership of the Honolulu Record Publish- 
ing Co., Ltd., discloses that out of a total of 8,133 subscribed 
shares of capital common stock, 7,830 shares are subscribed to by 
members of the Communist Party or a front of the Communist Party. 

From the foregoing, it is apparent that the Honolulu Record is 
securely within the orbit of control by the Communist Party. 

' See Hearings Regarding Communist Activities In the Territory of Hawaii — Part 2, 
p. 1657. 

74117 0-51 2 



8 REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 

Utilization of Communist Press Services 

- n 

This publication utilizes the articles of such well-known Communist 
press services as the Federated Press and the Allied Labor News. 
The cartoons appearing in the Honolulu Record are by artists serving 
the Communist press and are distributed by the Federated Press. 

The Special Committee on Un-American Activities on March 29, 
1944, cited the Federated Press — 

as a Communist-controlled organization financed by the American Fund for 
Public Service and the Robert Marshall Foundation, both principal sources of 
funds for Communist enterprises. 

Numerous references to Federated Press occur in testimony before 
the Special Committee on Un-American Activities. The following 
reference is quoted from the public testimony of Walter S. Steele 
before the committee on July 21, 1947 : 

The Allied Labor News Service is an international Communist service. It 
has correspondents in foreign countries, and it serves Communist publications. 
It augments, rather than competes vi^ith, the Federated Press, vphich deals with 
local and national events. 

* ♦ * Reds and Red fronters control many of the publications circulated 
in labor circles. Their writers have taken over the editorial columns, and 
articles are contributed in many instances by outright Communists. Most of 
these publications are served l)y the FVderated Press or the Allied Labor News 
Service, both of which have long been infiltrated if not actually controlled by 
the Communists. 

The Washington Daily News, November 10, 1947, contained an 
article by Fred W. Perkins, which quoted the AFL's Weekly News 
Service as follows : 

"The International Labor Press Association at its convention in San Francisco 
voted not to use the Federated Press news service on the grounds that it is 
edited along the lines of the Communist Party policy. 

"The'AFL has long held the same view with regard to the Federated Press. 
We, therefore, urge all the loyal affiliated labor press not to subscribe to the 
Federated Press or use its services." 

The Honolulu Record has carried Federated Press articles written 
by: 

Carl Haessler^ who in 1935 was an instructor at the Communist 
Workers School in Chicago and a contributor to the Daily Worker, 
official Communist Party organ. He traveled to Europe in October 
1927, where he attended the tenth anniversary of the Russian Revolu- 
tion in Moscow. 

Johannes Steel, who since 1937 has been a consistent contributor to 
newspapers and periodicals serving the Communist cause. He has 
contributed to Fight, official organ of the cited Communist front, 
American League Against War and Fascism, later known as the 
American League for Peace and Democracy ; to Soviet Russia Today, 
a magazine published by the Friends of Soviet Russia, a cited Com- 
munist front; to Far East Spotlight, the monthly publication of the 
cited Committee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy; to Slavic 
American, a publication of the American Slav Congress, also a cited 
Communist front ; and to the Daily Worker and Daily People's World, 
both official organs of the Communist Party. 

Harold J. Saleinson, who in 1947 was charged as a holder of a Com- 
munist Party membership book by the Hollywood Reporter, which 
also identified Salemson as Hollywood correspondent for the French 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 9 

Communist newspaper, Ce Soir. He was also the signer of a call to the 
Fourth Congress of the League of American Writers, a cited Com- 
munist front in New York City, on June 6-8, 1941. Salemson in 
1946 w^as listed as an instructor at the Peoples Educational Center 
which the Attorney General of the United States cited — 

as a subversive and Communist organization incorporated under the name Los 
Angeles Educational Association, Inc. 

Fred Zeserson^ who according to the records of this committee was 
in 1948 a member of the board of directors of the Committee for a 
Democratic Far Eastern Policy, which has been cited by the Attorney 
General of the United States as a Communist organization. In 1949 
he was listed as a member of its editorial committee. He has con- 
tributed articles to the Far East Spotlight, official publication of the 
Committee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy. 

Stetson Kennedy^ a sponsor of the National Non-Partisan Commit- 
tee to Defend the Rights of the 12 Communist Leaders. He has been 
a guest speaker before the Communist-cited Civil Rights Congress, 
and has signed an open letter to the Congress of the United States 
under the sponsorship of the Civil Rights Congress. 

Ed Hugh-s, a sports writer for the Federated Press and the Daily 
People's World, Communist paper on the Pacific coast. 

■Richard Sasuly^ Washington correspondent. Federated Press, who 
has voiced the Communist Party line in his articles, which are dis- 
tributed to the Communist press throughout the United States. His 
record in relation to subversive activities can be found in the Con- 
gressional Record of February 28, 1949, page A1155. 

The majority of cartoons printed in the Honolulu Record are those 
drawn by Ben Yomen, Fred Wright, and A. Redfield. These artists 
supply cartoons to the Communist press on the mainland. For ex- 
ample, a cartoon which appeared in the Honolulu Record of February 
23, 1950 (exhibit No. 8),^ was reproduced in the magazine section of 
the Worker, official organ of the Communist Party, February 26, 1950 
(exhibit No. 9).^° A cartoon by A. Redfield appeared in the Novem- 
ber 11, 1948, issue of the Honolulu Record (exhibit No. 10)." A car- 
toon by the same individual appears in the Daily People's World of 
March 13, 1948 (exhibit No. ll).^^ 

Ben Yomen's cartoons set a pattern of ridiculing the Congress of 
the United States and appear regularly in the Honolulu Record. 
For an example, see Honolulu Record, September 9, 1948 (exhibit No. 
12)." A similar cartoon by Yomen was printed in the Daily Worker 
of April 25, 1947 (exhibit No. 13), 



14 



LocAi. Writers for the Record 

Many of the persons in the Territory of Hawaii who write articles 
for the Honolulu Record have significant records of activity in the 
Communist Party or its front organizations. 

" Sep appendix, p. .S.S. 
'" See api)endix, p. 34. 
" See appendix, p. .S5. 
'^ See appendix, p. .36. 
" See appendix, p. ,S7. 
** See appendix., p. 38. 



10 REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 

Among those whose by-lines appear over stories in the Honoluhi 
Record are : 

'Wilfred OJca^ whose sports column appears every week in the sub- 
versive publication. Mr. Oka was identified as a Communist Party 
member by two former Communists in testimony before a subcom- 
mittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities in April 1950. 
Three other former holders of Communist Party membership cards 
identified Mr. Oka as having attended Communist Party meetings. 
Mr. Oka has also been affiliated with the Hawaii Civil Liberties Com- 
mittee. When subpenaed to appear before the subcommittee of the 
Committee on Un-American Activities, Mr. Oka refused to affirm or 
deny his Communist associations on the ground of self-incrimination. 

Stephen Murin., who is the present chairman of the Hawaii Civil 
Liberties Committee. Mr. Murin was identified as an active Com- 
munist Party member by Matthew Cvetic, an FBI undercover agent 
v/ithin the Communist Party, in testimony before the Committee 
on Un-American Activities on February 23, 1950. The files of the 
committee also show that Mr. Murin was engaged in Communist 
activities in Pennsylvania, the State of which he is a native. In an 
appearance before a subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, Mr. Murin refused to answer questions relating to Com- 
munist Party membership on the ground of self-incrimination. 

John Reinecke, identified as treasurer of the central committee of 
the Communist Party in Hawaii and as a member of the party's Terri- 
torial executive board. Four former Communists outlined Mr. Rein- 
ecke's leading role in Communist activities, in hearings held by a sub- 
committee of the Committee on Un-American Activities in Honolulu 
in April 1950. When called before the subcommittee, Mr. Reinecke 
refused to answer any questions related to his Communist activity on 
the ground of self-incrimination. Prior to the subcommittee hearings, 
Mr. Reinecke had been dismissed from a teaching position in the 
Territory on the basis of his subversive affiliations. 

Robert Greene^ who not only wrote for the Honolulu Record but 
also served as city editor of the publication in 1948. Mr. Greene, ac- 
cording to the files of the Committee on Un-American Activities, 
attended several Communist indoctrination courses in Hawaii and, at 
one time, conducted a class of his own in basic Marxism. Former 
Communist Donald Uesugi has named Mr. Greene as being present 
at a Communist Party meeting; Mr. Uesugi testified before a sub- 
committee of the Committee on Un-American Activities in April 1950. 
Mr. Greene has served as chairman of the Hawaii Civil Liberties 
Committee, as radio script writer for the Communist-controlled Inter- 
national Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, and as vice 
president of a Communist effort known as the Unemployed Workers 
Organization. Mr. Greene transferred his residence from Hawaii to 
the mainland in February 1950. 

Frank Marshall Davh^ author of a regular weekly column in the 
Honolulu Record entitled "Frankly Speaking." Mr. Davis' column 
defends Communists and attacks capitalism with the same vigor as 
columns appearing regularly in the Daily Worker and other frankly 
Communist publications. Typical of Mr. Davis' remarks are the 
following : 

Democracy today lies weak and slowly dying from the poison administered 
by the divident doctors in Washington and Wall Street who have fooled a trusting 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 11 

public into believiag that they are the specialists who would save us from the 
dread diseases of socialism and communism * ♦ * They hope to hand us 
fascism disguised as the healed democracy (Honolulu Record, July 28, 1949, p. 8). 

Mr. Davis constantly defended the 11 top United States Communist 
officials recently convicted in New York on charges of conspiracy to 
advocate the overthrow of the Government by force and violence. 
One of Mr. Davis' comments on the case was as follows : 

I feel strong sympathy for the Communist minority who are being oppressed 
for their political beliefs (Honolulu Record, October 20, 1949, p. 6). 

When Mr. Davis' column first appeared in the Record in May 1949, 
the Record boasted that the author was a member of the national 
executive board of the Civil Rights Congress. The organization is 
cited as Communist by Attorney General Tom Clark as well as by the 
Committee on Un-American Activities. Mr. Davis has signed a 
number of statements in behalf of Communists under the sponsorship 
of the Civil Rights Congress; one of these defended was Gerhart 
Eisler, notorious Communist international agent who escaped jailing 
for passport fraud by fleeing to the Soviet sector of Germany. 

Other front organizations of the Communist Party with which Mr. 
Davis has associated include : American Youth for Democracy, Abra- 
ham Lincoln School, National Federation for Constitutional Liber- 
ties, League of American Writers, the National Negro Congress, and 
the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee. 

Edward Rohrhough who has also contributed articles to such out- 
right Communist publications on the mainland as the Daily People's 
World and the New Masses, The Daily People's World is cited as 
"the official organ of the Communist Party on the west coast" by the 
Special Committee on Un-American Activities; the committee cited 
New Masses as the "nationally circulated weekly journal of the Com- 
munist Party."' Former Attorney General Francis Biddle also cited 
New Masses as a Communist periodical. 

Mr. Rohrbough was a speaker at the California Labor School, cited 
as subversive and Communist by Attorney General Tom Clark. Mr. 
Rohrbough in 1948 and 1949 was listed as a consultant to the Com- 
mittee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy, cited as Communist by 
Attorney General Tom Clark, 

During the war Mr. Rohrbough served in China as a press corre- 
spondent and employee of the Office of War Information. His writ- 
ings in the New Masses and the Daily People's World reveal that he 
is in complete sympathy with the Chinese Communists who, in Rohr- 
bough's eyes, are "liberating" China and bringing "democracy" to that 
land. 

Mr. Rohrbough's wife, Jeanette Nakama Rohrbough, has been iden- 
tified as an active Communist Party member by five former Commu- 
nists who testified before a subcommittee of the Committee on 
Un-American Activities in April 1950. 

Eleanor Agnew^ who served as vice chairman of the subversive 
Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee and as chairman of its educa- 
tional committee in 1949. Mrs. Agnew has recently taken up residence 
on the mainland. 

Adele Kensinger and Ray Jerome Baker^ whose Communist asso- 
ciations are detailed in the previous section of this report entitled 
"Ownership." 



12 REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 

Communist Party Line Content 

An analysis of the complete contents of the Honolulu Record reveals 
the strictest adherence to the Communist Party line. 

Articles referring to the Soviet Union or the Communist Party 
of the United States are consistently slanted to favor the Soviet 
Union and its American puppets. Friendly write-ups are also given 
to Communist movements in other countries, such as China, Greece, 
France, and the Philippines. Individual United States Communist 
leaders on numerous occasions receive favorable attention in the 
Honolulu Record, which reserves its most generous publicity, however, 
for the activities of Hawaii Communists. Communist-front organ- 
ization and Communist -controlled unions, both in Hawaii and on the 
mainland, are well publicized in the Record. 

The Record is equally consistent in presenting in an unfavorable 
light any actions which conflict with the interests of Communists. 
Thus, the Honolulu Record represents only criticism of American 
defense spending, the Marshall plan and European-recovery program, 
aid to Greece and [Nationalist] China, and other aspects of the United 
States foreign policy designed to help curb the spread of communism. 
The Record furthermore makes it clear to its readers that it has only 
contempt for the capitalist system. 

Conclusion 

The Committee on Un-American Activities, after analysis and 
investigation of the Honolulu Record since its first issue of August 
5, 1948, draws the inevitable conclusion that the Honolulu Record 
is a front for the Communist Party, despite the fact that the paper 
does not make this admission. 

It should be noted in this connection that during the past decade 
all Communist publications have gone to great lengths to give the 
impression of having no direct connections with the Communist Party. 
Even official publications of the Communist Party, USA, have ter- 
minated such designation since 1936 and appear instead as organs 
of certain publishing companies formed for that special purpose. 
The Honolulu Record conforms to this pattern completely. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities would like to point 
out that the success of such a newspaper, dedicated to disseminating 
Communist propaganda, depends upon support from deluded liberals. 
The Communists recognize that most Americans would not know- 
ingly support the Communist Party, and therefore have devised 
various front organizations and publications so as to ensnare the 
unwary liberal. The latter serves to add prestige to the Communist 
front and to attract other non-Communist support. 

William K. Bassett, administrative assistant to the mayor of Hono- 
lulu, falls into the category of those liberals who have aided and 
abetted the Communists' front publication, the Honolulu Record. 
By serving as a columnist for the Record, he has imparted an aura 
of respectability which the subversive publication does not deserve. 
This definitely was not in the best interests of the people of Hawaii 
or the Government of which he is an official. 



APPENDIX 



Exhibit No. 1. — Articles of association of the Honolulu Record Publishing Co., 
Ltd., filed with the office of the treasurer. Territory of Hawaii, August 27, 
1948 (pp. 14-20). 

Exhibit No. 2. — Affidavit of oflScers of the Honolulu Record Publishing Co., Ltd., 
filed in the office of the treasurer. Territory of Hawaii, August 26, 1948, 
(pp. 21-23). 

Exhibit No. 3. — Annual corporation exhibit of the Honolulu Record Publishing 
Co., Ltd., report for fiscal period ended August 31, 1949, filed December 8, 1949, 
in the treasurer's office. Territory of Hawaii (pp. 24-29). 

Exhibit No. 4. — Affidavit of Ichiro Izuka, June 2, 1950 (printed on p. 5 of text). 

Exhibit No. 5. — Daily Peoples World, August 24, 1943, page 1 ; article headed, 
"From Hawaii and Kansas Come Praise" (p. 30). 

Exhibit No. 6. — Daily Peoples World, February 4, 1948, editorial page ; letter to 
the editor, signed R. J. Baker, Honolulu (p. 31). 

Exhibit No. 7. — Letter, February 1, 1947, signed Ray Jerome Baker (p. 32). 

Exhibit No. 8. — Honolulu Record, February 23, 1950, page 8; cartoon by Fred 
Wright, Federated Press (p. 33). 

Exhibit No. 9.— The Worker Magazine, February 26, 1950, section 2, page 1; 
cartoon by Fred Wright, Federated Press (p. 34). 

Exhibit No. 10. — Honolulu Record, November 11, 1948, page 4 ; cartoon by A. Red- 
field (p. 35). 

Exhibit No. 11. — Daily Peoples World, March 13, 1948, page 5 ; cartoon by A. Red- 
field (p. 36). 

Exhibit No. 12. — Honolulu Record, September 9, 1948, page 8; cartoon by Ben 
Yoman, Federated Press (p. 37). 

Exhibit No. 13. — Daily Worker, April 25, 1947, page 7 ; cartoon by Ben Yoman, 
Federated Press (p. 38). 

13 



14 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 1, Page 1 



M nn wnoK or na ttcumm 



\r^0t> 



^^,ro 



vr^r'tf 



•t VM 



TBBtlTCaS or SAVAIZ 



JRWS 



AUG 2 T 1948 



-, ^^ ^,, TREASURErj OFFICE 

la tb* WmtUr of th« laeorpoimtion «f TERRITORY OF HAWAII 



ABficus or ASaOCIAZIOS 



aosoLOLB ixcQso KiBytsHiiia ooKPAiT, wra. 



Tlmt «», th« and«r»lgn«4, .11 raaldeata of the 
tomtory of Hamai. «o,irmg to boeoao Incorpowtod 
•• • oonwmtloB uMUr and in Moor<Unoo with tho lowo 
of oold Umtorr 9t tmmXX. oad to obt«in tho t»onoflta 
eonforrod by oold loiro upon oorposrutiono, do taoroby 

ollovlag 
Artloloo of AoaoolotloB. tbo tonio Mhoroof oholl bo 



otoektaeldoro in tfao eonporotlon. 

AMIOLK I. 
tbo mm of tho ooiporotlon *j«il bo 
mwi&SLV npoou) fobubixk oonpaix, Lti>. 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 1. Page 2 



15 



The plfte* of th« prlnelp«l office of the oorpoi*- 
AtloR 8fa»ll b« la Honolulu, City mai. County of Honolulu, 
territory of Hawaii; there aay he auoh eutbordlnate or 
branch off loee In euoh plaoe or plaoea within or without 
said Territory aa aay he deeaed neoeaaazy or raqulalte by 
the Beard of Olreotora to tranaaot the bualnaaa of the 
corporation, auoh hranoh or aubordlnate offloea to be la 
charge of auoh peraon or pereona aa aay be iQ>point'ed by 
the Board of Directors . 



HMigrJllfl 



that the purpoae for which the corporation la to 
be created and organleed le that of newapiver, book and 
paoipbltt puhllahlng, and alae general mercantile printing. 



1. the aaoont of the authorised capital stock of 
the corporation ahall be Tim tHOUSAND COLUUHS (160,000.00} 
to be dlYlded into tlM THOOSAND (10,000) aharee of coaaoa 
stock of the par ralue of FIVE OOLLABS (|5.00) per abare. 
the corporation ahall hare the prlTilege of subsequent 
extension of Ita oapltal stock froa time to time in the 
manner proTided by law by the lasuaaoe of either oommoa 

or preferred stock to an amount not exceeding OME HUKDREO 
ARC rim tHOOSAXO miURB (flW.OOO.OO) in the aggregate. 

2. th# Board of Directors is authorized, aubjeot 
to the preeaptlTe rights of the helders of oemBK>a stock 
of the corporation aa set forth ia raragri«>h 9 of this 
Article IT, to determine the ooaslderation and the tema 
and coaditloas «9oa which additional shares of stock, 
with or without par value, may be iemted and what porUoa 



74117 0-51- 



16 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 1. Page H 



of >uoh oonaldaratioB ahftll ooaatltute o*plt«l and iihat 
portion, If any, paid-in aurplua, aubjaot to the appll- 
oalila proTlilona of tbaa* Artlolaa and of ]av. 

3. In eaaa of any Inoraasa of th« oatstand.lng 
capital atodc of the corporation by the laeuanoe or ra- 
laauanoa of any afaarea of any olaaa, or by the laeuanoe 
of any obllgiatlona or aeourltlea oonvartlbla into aharaa 
of capital atook (imleaa the aaae ahall be laeuad or aold 
or grantad In eonneotlon with tba aeqolaltlon of tha 
property or of aubatantlally tha entire aaaeta of a 
going buBlnesa or In ooanectlon with a oargar or oonaoll- 
d&tlon), auob stook, obllgatlone or aecarltlaa ahall, 
before being aold or offered to othere, be offered to the 
holders of the ooaaon atock of tha corporation aa of tha 
date of laeuanoe aa ahovn by the stock booka of the oor* 
poratlon upon auob teraa (which teraa ahall not be laaa 
favorable than the teraa t^toa whloh aald aharea are 
thereafter aold to other*) aa ahall be detenilned by the 
Board of Dlrectora in proportion to the aharaa of oownon 
atock reapeotlTely held by such atookholdera at aueh data. 

4. The corporation ahall have poiMr froa tlae to 
time to create an additional elasa or additional elaaaea 
of stock with Buch preferencea, rotlng powara, reetrio- 
tlona and quallf icatlona thereof as ahall be fixed in 

the reaolutlon authorizing the leauanoe thereof In aooordanoe 
with law. Subject to the preeqptlTa rlghta at tha holdere 
of ooamon atook aa aat forth In Paragraph 3 of thla Article 
IT, the Board of Olractora la authorised to datamln* the 
ter«a and oondltlons tQ>on which and the peraoaa to whoa 
attthorlsed aM uniaauad aJtiaraa akay be ieauad and aold. 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
EXHIBIT 1, Page 4 



17 



1. Th« off leora of tfao oorporatlon shalX be a 
7ro8ia*nt, on* or Boro Tloo-JPfoBidonti, * Btor^tmrj, and 
• traasurer, all of i^ok aball b« oloeted bf tta* atook- 
holdara or alaetod by th* Board of Clrootora aa ahall be 
preaorlbed In the By-Lava. There aa^ alao be aaab Aaala- 
tant Seoretarlaa and Aaaiatant freaaarera aa Buqr be 
dcaaed dealrabXa. The offloera need not be etookholdera, 
except aa aay otherwla* be provided In the By-I<avii of 

the corporation. There wgr alao be aooh other aubordlnate 
offloera and agenta aa the bualneea of the ooz7>oratlon 
Bugr require, lAio ahall be elected or appointed aa the 
Sf-Lmm m*jf praaorlb*. The ante peraon mmj hold at the 
ease tlae tvo or oore offleee. 

2. There ahall be a Board of Dlreetora of not 
leaa than three (S) noaibera, vho need not be atoekholdere, 
exoept a* aay otherwlae be provided "by the By-Lava. The 
Dlreetora ahall be elected or j^ppolnted and any Taoanclea 
at any tlae occurring ahall be filled by the atooiUwldera 
or the Dlreetora or any thereof In aueh laanner and for 
auoh terae aa the By-Lava say preaorlbo. 

S. The peraone vho are the firat offloera and 
directors of the corporation are aa fellova: 



Prealdent " 
Tloe-?realdent - 



Kojl Ariyoshi 
Lewis K. Yogi 



Saoretary 
Treaaurar 



Director 



Cyril Bristow 

— Adrian Palomino 

- KobuyxUd. Katsuzakl 



4. All the povera and authority of the eorporatlon 
ahall be Teaied In and oay l>e exercised 1^ the Beard of 
Dlreetora exeapt aa otherviae prorided by law, theaa 
Articlea of Aasooiatlon or by the By^Lanra af tb* *(Mrp«»lti*») 



18 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 1, Pase H 



and In fortMranat «iail not In XlMltaUon at tftia gmtnO. 
pov*r, the Board of Siraotora ahall hara powers to ao> 
qulra aad dlapoaa of propwrty; to i^poiat a fkmaral 
Kaaagar, Branoh MaBagara aad aueh othar aaaagara. offleara 
or agaata of tho eerporation as la Ita Jndgaaat tba 
bualnaaa tbaraof M7 raqolra, and to eoafer upon and to 
dalagate to thaa by povar of attornay or othazwiaa aaoh 
povar an authority *a It ahall datamlna; to f Ix tha 
aalariaa or ooapanaatioa of any or all of Ita offloara, 
agaata and w^ployaaa and In Ita dlkoratlon requlra eaoorlty 
of any of tha« for tha falttifnl parforwiaoa of any of 
■ thalr dutlaa; to daolara dltrldaada In aooordaaoa with 
lav whan It ahall daea It axpadlant; to awka rulaa aad 
ragulatloaa not Inooaalateat with law or tbaaa Artiolaa 
or tha By^Lawa for tha traaaaotloa of txtalnaaa; to la- 
atmot tha offloara or agaata of tha oorporatloa with 
raapaot to, aad to autherlia tba tvtlng of. atook of 
othar eorporatlona owned or bald by thla oorporatloa; 
to Ineur moh indabtadaeaa aa May be daaaad aaoaasary, 
which indabtadnaaa aay axoaad the aaooat of tha oorpora- 
tlon»a capital atook; to ereata euoh ooanittaa {incltiding 
an axaeutlre oo«mlttaa or eoaadtteea) aad to daalgnata 
aa aeaibare of each onultteea each paraoaa aa It ahall 
detemlne, and to confer npoa aaoh ooaalttaea auoh 
powera and authority aa aay by reaolutloa be aet forth 
for tha puipoae of carrying oa or azarolslag aay of the 
powera of tba oorporatloa; to create aad aat aalda f- 
aerre foade for" any paxpoaa, and to laraat any fanda of 
tha corporation In auoh aeeorltlaa w othar property aa 
to It aay aeea proper; to rwore or aaapend aay offloar 
and generally to d« any aad avery Uflfrfal act aaoaaaary 
or proper to oiurry into affeot tha powera, pwnpoaea and 
objaota of tha oorporatloa. 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 1. Page 6 



19 




20 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 1, Pase 7 




REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 2, Page 1 



21 



Of tm mum or tEs nuMORn 

of tte 
TBnifOAT or BUUUXX 



In th* iBttcr of tl»i XMorporatioa of 
Howounur mcobs nmLmBimi ccatpinr, ltd. 



Torrltory of Bcvail, > 

rir«t Jadlcltl Clrettlt* ) 



KOII ABIZOSHI, CISIC BSXSTOV and AORIAI PAUWIWO, 
•II of Eonolala, City ami Cooaty of Bonolala, Torritorjr 
of anrall, baTlng baan duly sworn, apon tbalr oatha 
dapoaa airf aay — 

(1) Shat tha aald KOjri AltnoSEI la tba Prasldant 
and ttea aald CIBIL HSI8t««F la tba Saeratary asd tha aaid 
ISRUX PilUaillO la tha Traavorar of an assoelatloa fonwd 
on ^i» -^-^^ day of Aogaat, l<3Mt to baooM a body 
eori>orata, tradar tha Inra of tha Tarrltory of Havali, 
W tha aaaa of tha mmQtrJW RSCORO poblishhq ccmuit, 

(2} Biat tha maOmT of anthorisad aharas of tha 
proposad corporation la tan thoaaand (10,000) ; 

(3) That tha following parsons hara anbaeribad for 
aharaaj tha total mUbar of sharaa sntaeribad baing 7881} 
and hava paid In eash as eapital tha aaotmt appaarlnf 
opjMslta thair raapaetiva naaasi . 



22 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 2, Page 2 





Noaber of 






Shares 


Amocmt of 




Subscribed 


Cash Paid 


Hame 


^^^B «<*i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


Tn 




Arminlnl, E. 


3 


% 15.00 


Arlyoshl, Kojl 


7500 


3130.00 


Acob, Antonio C. 


5 


25.00 


Agnew, Leo 


1 


5.00 


Barboza, WllllaB 


IG 


50.00 


Bakar, R. J. 


20 


100.00 


Bassatt, Dorothaa C. 


2 


10.00 


Sous log., Charles S. 


1 


5.00 


Brlstow, Cyril 


6 


30.00 


Culinary & Service 






Workers' Onion 


2 


10.00 


Chagnon, Raymond 


1 


5.00 


Ching, HunK Dau 


1 


5.00- 


Eshelman, Mr, 4 Mrs. 


Carl 1 


5.00 


Ellas, John. Jr. 


1 


5.00 


Pujlmoto, Eileen N. 


1 


5.00 


Hlga, Yelko 


3 


15.00 




100 


500.00 


Hawaii Civil Liberties 




Committee 


10 


50.00 


Hosea, Henry K. 


5 


25.00 


Jessen, Otto S. 


2 


10.00 


Kim, Rosalie 


1 


5.00 • 


Klmoto, Denlchl 


10 


50.00 


Kempa, Robert 


1 


5.00 


Kldo, Mitsuyuki 


20 


100.00 


Kotoki, Matsue 


. 5 


25.00 


Matsuyama, Hajlme 


5 


25.00 


Miyamoto, Richard S. 


2 


10.00 


Morishlge, Richard 


20 


100.00 


Miyaeawa, M. 


5 


25.00 


Matsumoto, Yukl & Sakae 5 


25.00 


Matsuzaki, Nobuyukl 
Maehara, Frank 


1 


5.00 

20.00 


Hagai, Hisashi 


2 


10.00 


Ogure, Tsuneko 


5 


25.00 


Osakl, Doris 


h 


20.00 


Oshlkata, Karen 


1 


5.00 


Oahu CIO Council 


5 


25.00 


Pittler, Alvln R. 


5 


25.00 


Perlsteln, Esther 


10 


50.00 


Peterson, W, C. 


2 


10.00 


Paloffilno, Adrian 


6 


30.00 


Shlraki, J. I. 
Seitz, Gottfried 


20 


100.00 


5 


25.00 


Toklnasa, Nani 


1 


5.00 


TannebauK, Gerald 


5 


25.00 


Wong, Sam 


10 


50.00 


Watanabe, Hajlae 


5 


25.00 


Wiles, E. S. 


1 


5.00 


Yaraamoto, R. M, 


20 


100.00 


YoKl, Lewis K. 


-2- 


% 5035.00 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 2, Page :^ 



23 



(W) That the sharsa of tha proposed corporation 
haya a par valaa of Flva Dollara ($5.00) par ahare, 
and tha subscribers afread to pay $5-00 for each share 
subscribed. 



Subscribed and sworp to 
before me this ^^'"^ day 
of August A.D. 19^8 



V J.^lJ.,-iL.-^ryjL~^-L~. 



Notary Public,- Tlr'st 
Judicial Circuit. 



eyL^^ 



24 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibits, Part 1 



LAW RELATING TO THIS EXHIBIT 

"SECTION 6752 R/L 1935.« »m«.d«l. ANNUAL EXHIBIT. EXCEPTIONS; in.pwtkm by whofo. Every coipontioo noi 
.l..mo,»«ry. religiou,,' liur.ry, cd-.c.tion»l or promoting »Uly .m»..ur ..hl.tu:,. shall „n„.lly p„«m. , full .ml «««.. txhibh of 
k, .«"« to th. .rLur.r. Such «hibit .h.ll be made ., of December 3U,. of each year unle« the corporatKm h« adopt^ a (i^l y«r 
ba,U X tlL^ the calendar yeaJ baa.s, in which even, the corporation -nay make apphcafon to the treasurer «,d be .ltow«l by the |re«. 
orer to make its exhibit as of the end of it, fiscal year ; provided, that, such request is mad. of the .r«..or« prtor w he end of the c^»d.r 
year The eihibit shall contain such information and be mad. in such form as the treasurer, with tht approval of the go»er.wr, diall r.- 




to obtain the required information and prepare the exhibit. No exhibit shall b. available for m.p«t»n by ^rs th« ofRcer. o( the Wr- 
ritory or of any county, or city, and county, or by th. offic«TS or stockholders of the corporation vrhicb lUde the eihibrt, or bjr any bom 
fide CTeditor of the corporation; provided, that the treasurer may permit th. inspection of any exhibit by any other pcraoa •pon bem« 
satisfied that th. inspection i> desired for some lawful and proper purpose. 

Examination of books, etc, by treasurer. The treasurer shall hive power .ither himself, or by one or mor« commiuioMra »i>- 
oointed by him to call for the production of the books and papers of the corporation, and to examine .ts ofBcer.. membera and other. 
touchine iu affairs under oath. The annual reports above mentioned, and the result of the cxammatton, the treasurer may m hts diKreUon 
1.V before the governor, and also publish. In case any corporation shall refuse to produce its books and papers upon the request of the 
treasurer or th. commissioners appointed by him, or in case any of th. officers or member, of any corporation shall refuK «. be «.mi»«d 
on oath touching the affairs of the corporation, then the treasurer, or the commissioners, may apply to a circuit )udge at chamber. lor u 
order to compel the production of the books and papers or the examination of the ofRcers or members of the corporation, obedience K» 
which order may he enforced by the judge, in like manner with his ordinary d.crees and order.. 

Penalty Any corporation violating or neglecting or failing in any particular to conform to or comply with any of the provisioo. 
of this section rtall forfeit to the territory oitt hundred dollar, for every such vioUtioii. neglect or failure, to be recovered by actio* 
brought in the name of the territory by the treasurer : a continuance of a failure to file the required report shall be a Kpante ««eii« lor 
e«ch thirty (30) days ot the continuance." 

"SECTION 6753. FEES for filing annual exhibit of domestic and foreign corporations, ten dollars. . Provided, that noM 

ot the« additional fees shall be required to be paid by any religious, chariublf. educational, or other «)rpor«tioo which doe. aot iuoe 
shares of capital stock, nor by any other corporation which U not organized for pecuniary profit." 




INSTRUCTIONS 

RKAC Saotlon 6752 R/L it Ha««il, 1935, as aasnded, carefuXlr< Hot* tbat 

this return Is due on the last day of Februanr for corporations oloilac 



•their booXs at the end of the calendar year, as of DeceBber 31st. Tor 
other corporations that have been granted pemiaBloD to file their 
returns as of the end of their fiscal year, this r»turo U due slxtr 
(60) days from the end of the fiscal year. 

EXTENSIONS Of time to file this retuJ'n will be granted only upon »rltf n 
application before the date upon ehich this return is due. 

UNLESS every item is properly filled in on a typewriter or clearly printed. 
this exhibit will not be accepted for filing and the corporation >lll 
be subject to the penalties set forth in Section 6782. 

A 7ILING FEE of Ten Dollars (|10) oust acooapany each return filed. Make 
checks payable to •Treasurer, Territory of Hawaii.* 



THIS RETURN MUST BE SWORN TO BEFORE A NOTARY PUBLIC. 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibits, Part 2 



VOTINO POWERS AND KLBCTIONE 

1. Smu whether or not each share o( ttock has the richt to one vote ; if not, pve fall particular! in footnote. 

2. Are votinc rights proportional to holdings? I*s If not. suie in footnote the relation between holdings and corresponding 

voting rights. 

J. Are voting rights attached to any secorities other than stock ? ta. .. . If so, name in footnote each security, other than stock to 

which voting rights are attached. v . . 

4 Has any class of securities any special privileges in the election of Directors, Tmstees. or Manager, or in the determination or cor- 
porate action by any method? .JJo . If so, describe fully in a footnote each such class of issue «nd give a succinct SUte- 
ment showing clearly the character and extent of such privileges. 

5. Give the date of the latest closing of the Stock Books prior to the date of this Report Jtu«us.t._3i _. _ ., 19 ifS 

6. State tlie total voting power of all stockholders at the date of such closing IJbO _ _ -vote*. 

■7. Sute the total number of Stockholders of Record, corresponding to the answer to Inquiry No. 6 .- fiP „ Stockholders. 

8. Give the names and voting powers of Stock and other Security holders, on the date mentioned in Inquiry No. 5 in the following 
suteinent. 

9 If the holders of Capiul Stock or other securities carrying voting power, are represented by a Tmslee, make full discknure in List 
of Stockholders below of ihe nimes and addresses of the equitable owners of such stock, together with the number of shares 
and toul par value of same to which they would be.catitled upon distribotioa of the Trust. 



STOCKHOLDEtiS 

NAMBOtPVU. 



Acob, Aiitoiiio C. 
A«aew, Lao C. 
Apilndo, JLitdxaa 
ArlyoiM. toji 
ArmXnlal, X. 
Biker, K. S. 
2<ur)K>», VlUiaa 
Baaaett, Dorothwa X. 
BouiXos, Charlaa 5. 
Bristow, Oyrll 
Cha^non, Baymond 
CMc«, Hua« Dow 
Culiaary & Service ¥ork«r» 
Sll&s, Joha Jr. 
IshelBU, C«rl. Mr. & Mrs. 
Tujlmoto, Ill««s 
aiaa. Nsaaichl 
ai^waai Civil Ubertlea Coxa 
Blgsi. Telke 
Bo' V6 I«99e 
HokMib, Shtro 
Hosea. Henry I. 
Jensen, Otto S. 
I&aak&olc, lusft 
I«j>p&, Bob 
Kensin^er, Ad»l« 
Him, Boaall* 
Xtmoto, Oenicbl 
Kino to, Shiiuko 
Lee, t«l Soon 
Linbtgaro, Thaodor* K. 
Maahark, Trauik 
Mataumoto, Tukl. « Sakaa 
KatstvasK, tajima 
Kalsoxaki, 1. 
tet^la, L. >. 

MinuU, Chiaico 
Mljagawai, M. . 
Xlyanoto, Bichard 8. 
Koris'alga, Bichard 
Motoki, Katsua 
Ba«ad, ElSMiil 
Bakatsu, Sarrj 
0»hu CIO Cojnoil 
Ogori . Isuneko 
Oablitata, Karaa 
OsaJci, Doria 
FoIoBisc, Adrian 
Perlstaln, Xathar 
Fataraoa, V. C. 
Plttlar, Alvlnl. 
Sella, Oottfrald 
Sbiraki, J. S. 

Tannabausi. Oarald 

Tokeaasa, Baal 
Vatanabe, Bajiaa 
Vlles. X. X. 
VsQC, Saa 
TaaaBoto, ^ 

ladao. laillo C. i 



RESIDENCE Wt 

ADDMSSWFVU. 



Olaa, Hawaii 

2531-C Bate Street, Hon. 

Box 133, Pahala, Hawaii 

21-BO HalawB Tet.Eeg. Hon. 1'. 

kOJ lalaiooku St. Bon. 

19 U Ealakaua Age. Hon 

570 Eaaubou lAne, Hon. 

^33-C Lewers Bd. Hon. 

l63l» Sherman Park Fl , Hon. 

£357 -C Palolo Ave . , Hon 

c/o Seamen's Club, Bon. 

Zky2-J> Tualtala St.. Bon. 

Pier U, Tera. 31d«. Eon 

60';. iStb St. CHiL3 Hon. 

lailaaela, Hawaii 

1526 Kalbee St. Hon. 

Box ^ik, Lanal City, Lasai 

0/0 1011-B Xapahnlu Ara . Bon 

737 01 U Hd. Hon.. /. 

^lOBuah-St. Sc^ Tranciaco ] 

Box ii37 Lin)*l City, Lonal 

3310 KookeauAve. &>Q. 

I6ID MiJcahala Way, Hon 

229 Sesba Ave. Hilo 

ll»09^ Asaeraon St., &>n 

1658 Piikol St., Hoi.. 

1598 Iharaton Ave., Hoc. 

2162 Matcanani Dr. Hon. ] 

22i»l Kakjusani Dr., Son. 

Box 267, Lanai City, Laaal 

c/o U26 Kaoahana St., Eon. 

815-0 lanoa St.. Hon. 

1063 Elver St., Honl 

Olaa. Bavail 

6^7 Kunawal Lane, Boo. 

12U5 So aat. 8t. Unco la, 
Xabraaka 
Box Ik, Laaal City. lanal 

;3U Lualtania St. Hon. 

95 Merchant St., B». 20, Bon 

27^2 Kalihi St., Hon. 

1311* Liona St. 

Box 90. Olaa, Efcwali 

92O-I &>uaten Lane, Eon. 

e/o Pier 11, lera. Blig. Bon 

2)190 Maklki Bgta. Bd. Eon. 

Box 1132, Honolulu 

933 17th Ave., Hod. 

3202 Xaat Kanoa Bd. , Eos. 

3621 laliuki Ave.. Hon. 

836-16 OaA3, Honolulu 

717 Ocean Tiew Dr., Hon. 

2357-C Palolo Ave.. Bon. 

c/o laii-ja Prodocta, 1301 

Elver St., Honolulu 

1202 Ling Sen Lu, Shanghai, ( hina 

1555 Plikoi St. Hon. 

lOa Oha St. Hcnololu 

171^7.^, LanaklU St. Bon. 

-1 St. Honolulu 

,1a St. Honolulu 

e/o Piar 11, iJ.ST'Vldg. Hon 



TorkuSumaumoK 
AT Pas Tuna 



Aaomrr PAI 
wmtS 



25.00 

5.00 

5.00 

37,500.00 

15.0c 

200.00 

50.00 

10.00 

.5.00 

80.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

25.00 

50.00 

I5.6O 

560,66 

25.00 

25.00 

10 00 

5.00 

5.00 

35.00 

5.00 

530.00 

300.00 

25.00 

50.00 

20.00 

25.00 

25.00 

105.00 



26 REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 

Exhibit 3, Part 8 



Annual Corporation Exhihit of the hosoluu; skobs Fmusmm co 

COMPABATrVE GENERAh BALANCE SHEET 



BniLtxiNo or Yi 



Knu u>- Veae 



Camnt AIMU- 



ra Bunk and On Hud 



Accottiiti RecdTshle 



Nafta Rcctinbfe 



McfCin nnitt n Xrsxnit 



A2^ Other 



Unexpired Zassnuicc 



niiiiiiBiHiiiilllil 

— IIIIIHlHINIini 

illiiiiiBimiiiini 
jiiiiiiiHiBiiiiini 

IIIIIIIIHIBIIIIIIII 



niiiniBi 

nminHmiiiiiiii 



IIIIIIIIH ■IIIIIHI 




8SI!liSSiii8BS!ii!llkHiw 

SHiiiirasiSBBHiissaiii 

■iiiiiiiB ■iiiiuia ■iiMiiiS SiiSi 



AS other 



lincstiDCttfat 



Stada-ljoal 



B<]Rd('—Loc« 



-Mainund 



Examt (U. S. Territorial, MuntauaT} 



BttUdioct 



Madiiixnr and Eaunaem 



Debvciy Eaiunraeat 



Furniture and FuUum 



AU Other 



iiHUMdiiiglslilimi 



i ....»»« J!!!!!SB B!i!!Sl liiniHl 

jBHuiiMniniiiBniiiiMHBr 

niiniiiHimnijiiB Miiiiiia ■ 
iiniiiHiHiiNinS B[nliNB ■ 



mniiii 

IIHIIIII 



n 1 










1 


. .. 








i 1 


- — - — i 


i. 








Total Aueti 



LXAUUTIES AND IV£T W ORTH 



Cunrcnt LiabiUtia 



Accounti Fajnue 



NocoPavaUe 



■iiiiiiiHiniiiiiiB ■iiiiiiiH ■iiniiii 

■IIIIIIIHIHIIIIHIIB ■IMHIH ■llllllii 

iliiiiil8i&iilliii8MiilBiBiSnnlB 




Dividend! 



Another 



rixod LUbiiitiea 



Bond luuea Outstandi 





orfiadDebu 



For Taxe» 



For Lneaised Intereat 



Net Worth 



PreCcrrtd Stock laened 




iiiiHiHiiiini 

IIMIIIHIBII 

liniiiiBii 



■iminHfliii 

■IHL__ 

nimni 
■iiini 
■iiimi 



Siiiiiiil 

I 



■■■■Bilillliii 




REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibits, Part 4 



27 



COMPARATIVE PROFIT AND LOSS AOCOUlfT 




Total Inv^tnorY.ftmli 
T T . r\ 



Cost of Sales 



Gross Profit 



Sellinc Expenses 



Admiuist 

\Vt Pfnfi f ?rH r ■n<i<^ from ( 

Inc»me from Investments 



Interest. Commissions, etc. 



Total Profit or Loss 



Deductions from Earnings 



Interest on Mort pjges 

interest on Bonded Dchi 



Other Deductions 



Xet Profit or Ij>s5 for the Year - 



Dividends on Common ' 



Surplus or Deficit (as per Balance bbeet) 



As o* Dccemher 31. 19... 



■IUIIIIHWIIIIII_ 

■iiiiiiHH ■iiniiia 
■iHiiHHimiiiiiia 
■iiiiiiiBWiiiiiia 

■IIIIIIIHIHIIIIIIIH 
■iniillBBIIIIIIIH 
■IIIIIIIBHIIIIIII] 



■IIIIIIIHlllllllllHfl 
■iimHaiininnian 
■miiilBllUNllllHn 
■HHiiiHiiiiniiisn 
■iininHiMiiiiiiBn 



nnHHiniiiiiiHii 
iiiiiiHiiniiii|!Bi 

IIIIIIIB HUllllHIHIIIIinBllliniilH I 



■■iiniiiHiMiiiiiii 
laiiiiiiiBinHiM 

IBIIIIIIiaiBlllllHi 
I ■IIHIIIHIBWIMBi 



■iiHiiiaiMiiii!!! 
■iHiiiiHiniiiMii 
■iiiiiiiHiniiiiiii 



IIIIIIHI 

IIH! 



jiiiiiiii 

'"lllliHBlBIIIIIIII 

imiiiiiiaiBiiiiiii! 

illilBIBBININII 
IlilMIBBIMHI 
iwr 




iiiSI" 

nun 

millBlBIIIIIMBimBIIIIB -^, 

B!Si!!!B!5!!!!!!!B!!!ii!!!l!B! 

■linillBBIIIIIIIBIIBIBIIIifllHl 
■liniNB BIIIIHia BIBIIII^ 

IBIHBBIHIIIII ~ 

miMBBIIIIIIII 



[■iiniiiBiBiui!!!! 
niiniiiBiBiiiiiiii 



IIHIIIIHIHIIIIIIH 
"llllllHIIIIIIINBII 

iiBimaBiiiiiiiBii 
iimniiHr- 



BSlHniBii!!!!!!!!5! 
BiHiiiiaininiMpil 
BiHiiiifliiiiiiiHir 



BIINIIIBmilllHIL ^ 

IIIHIHI 



■imi 
■iiiiiiiBi 
— ^iiiiaiii 

iiir^ 



BIBIIII 
BIHIIII 
BIBIIII 
Biililil 



m 
■I 




Capital stock 

Ko 13&! shirts of Capital Stock ictually 

issued during ftresent ytar, at par value $2.r.y9 

Cash received as consideration for issue, as ahove 

Cash vaJuc of other Property acquired or Service* 
received as consideration for above Isstie ; 



Property $.,P..P9. 
Services $.0.00 



.$ 6.i.«?0.,.C)0.. 
.$.i..809..C»., 



CAPITAL STOCK Amount purcl>»se<) by Company 

of its stock during present year: 20. 

shares at par value of $.5«fift $...19Q..C(0... 

Arttount of such re-acquired itock sold bter duritijf 

year . .r«- 5hai« at (Mr value of $.,...rQ- 1 A>f^... 

rujunr.n debt. 

rionds actually issued during present year %. §*QQ.,. 

Cash ccmsidcmtion re«ived „, — * 0.00 

Other consideration received 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS OF THE COMPAKY, AS OF DECEMBER SI, »».. 



mxsixmn 



riCli/PBSSlDKSf 



S2CH!TAaY-TEItlSUaSi 



21-BC lalmva Tet. Ea 



AarlwJ Palo«lM 



Gyrll Brntow 



7-C Pftlolo ATfl&u«. Honolulu. T. R. 



BO*KC OF OIRiSOTORSi 



DIRECTOR 



„..-....__DXSECICa. 



-JkaHttciaiSalXx .i;.1B7,.n 

i 64T lIUMTtI Tanii. I 

_.a«ilifi...S......3:»,!t,t9. ..Sin 11. TenriMi 

JiA«l» Keno it|g«r " 



rittoT 2?J7-C 



,...I...ML.., 

. .-t,...B. 

Hnnnhtlti,..T-> « 



AFFIDAVIT 

The unilrrxioniril .>^*lt**«i(r*<rr"o/ the Carfornlion /or nMch this crkibil is made, heinq July jTcorn. defiltet nd myi llinl Otis 

nts, has been examined by hin and it. to file belt of hit Itnowtedgeond btticj. a true and eorrert exhibit 

uutde m fjood jaith, and that the list of Storbholders, alto yiven in said exhibit, is true omd forrtei. ^ / 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this . . ^^-r:^- ' 



t»d sworn to before me tins . . 

S".^.. At, of ..Msf^mtm ,. 



Hotor-j rulilir, .%&y^. tudieial CireuH, 

Tcrrilnry of Ifai^-nii. ^ty Comtuission f.xpires. 






28 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 3, Part 5 




REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 3. Part 6 



29 



mmauju} ucoss pubuskuu co.. liro. 

8U Sh«rliUn ttrvat 
■BMlalu, T. K. 



• KktmaoK or ttsucui. ocmin<m 

k% Clos* of >t»iM«« •& Aucu»t 31, I9U9 



Caab OB Btoid: 






For Ocposlt 


0.00 




lottBoe Cfa«ok 


3-90 




Offleo Fund (Pottjr teah) 


0.00 




GoaBorcl&l AccouAt 






Biolnp Katloaal Bank, loBolala, f . I. 


2.1X1*. 10 


2. 117 -60 


SiiuifaoBt 




5M^-50 


i.ceaunt« &»e»lTiU)lo 




i.ni.s"* 


Adtrauusot S*ealT»Dl« 




230.15 


Pottal Bopeaita 




66.»»7 


OrgMl«a>tloD»l Xxpatsat 




^SiHK!! 


TotiL Assras 







tazaa Payabla 

Paders.1 Withholding 

Social Saeurlty VithholdlM 

Tarrltorlal Vlthboldiag 

Sfilarlaa A Wacaa Pagrahla 

Aceounta P^rabla 

Salea CoBaiaalona Fayahla 

Iioaaa Pi^rabla 

ntil LUBILITISS 



Stock Authorlaad 
Stock Subacrlhad 
Stock Uoaubaerlhad 



91-95 
17.06 

33.93 1U2.9U 
2.JW0.83 

238.26 



ItAL Accouns 



50,000.00 



Stock Vnpald-Vor 
Stoo^ PKid-ror (OwnaraUp) 
Uaa, Opar»tinc Saflelt 
One Taar endad Au<uat 31, 19USI 

VOBTB, Au«uat 3I, ISkS • 



>,900.00 



30 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 5 



PEOPLE'S^IUORLD 



I 



Vol. 6NNo. 198. 



(htrr HMn^1m 



the! BurrtM rum- 

iliont of AiYi*»riran 
**»s. \t win involv 
sr rtirfirull «ftip| 

nrrrs.stfhtink' Innrt 
ttis of rivets wlii'ii 
hi*rn using to siii> 

n Burma 

ifmn r»f JjipfKi'-sf 

<a in lh<» A]i-U(tan<- 

(l( in (llf JtlltftnOK* 

jT- • xiwris brlii-vr 

I'l iiJin Jiit ;irifi s- .i 
Ai'Mii 'itn* .will v.i.td i 
iimii'*ii;n "f liHi tJiss- I 
h'' Kunlrs HFirt (ws- | 
am** some <if lh»' | 
i,f J«p:in itrofwr. 

«»*• *t farnmiishlrti t 
rn KiirlifM will tH<: 
ri.l>. I 

■»* of R {M>Wfrful j 

in lh« Altniiittn*. 
K thp narlhri n np- 
tiMin. U is hnpfti ' 
ij3ttn«'sc homo flept . 

-atiun of the «l- 
i-cpfsful subniHrint' 
wnialso was for**. 
)i 4^ ihi- iTftfiupn- 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 24. 1943 



Mattel 



4^ lh<- IT 



FROM HAWAII 
AND KANSAS 
COMES PR Aist: 

ii«*ari<>rM from Kan««a«. Iduho, 
T«»\a«, Ori*c«»n and HswhU r**s- 
M^TPd xupimrl for Thr P*Ht|»|r"*. 
World tiKla.v wtfh r.m»r*hu*lnn)* 
(it thf V*<'(«r> f-'itnd Drivri. 

R. i. IV'tki'r, M photoeraphrr 
on KMlnkHitH ns^titi*' In Hono- 
lulu. wrM("* 

"<'iiii{t'nitiil»it)niiH atiii cnorf 
wlKh«>M fiir .vfiiir oontlnitrd «ur- 
rf^H In fc*'ltlnK' out Ml A1 wnrk- 
inc rltttM. p«iH*r. In IIm^w limeii 
The »'W K iif^ilifi moff than 



Knm* nn nrniy riimp In \lt-- 
iorta, Ki4iiHii<«. « |)rtviit«> Kcndn 
$0.00 Atiri rtHnnifntn: 

"A* » Imdf iinluntttt now In 
the I . S. Arn)>. I rpahu> that It 
In ah<««htt4''l> i-i»M>nltttl that \(inr 
I»«I»«"r t-urry nn tht* fiffht on 
the hunt*' fritnt. May I tak«> tijl* 
i)[)|H>rtiiiUfv t« thank you for 
k4-*'i<lnK nit> lit(ormi<<l oa what 
In h«p|Mmlnc oa thtt Uhor 
front." 



rrnlf.s ai-ro';'^ at laft^&t accounts 
Suiulwy. which would mean the 
Nazi Rnrnson wnutd artuatly have 
to fiRlit its way out. 

A f**!*- hours nftfr Ihf Na«i ex- 
ptitHHlion, cam** an ortlpr of the 
riny from Premier Marshal Stalin, 
in M«»*^-'>w, fl»»rlarinc the Red 
Arnn h»iH tak»»n Kharkov by as- 
sault 

Thp M<Mwow population had tt« 
attf^ntlnn atlrartrd to th^ aewa 
hv B thundrrlnic t<t aalvoe* frotn 
tts euna of th4> p«pftal*B defo aa ea. 

OSDKR OK THE DAT 

Tho ftrst quut»tion to vfftiv^ 
• HTsfas fioni the orrier waS: 

"Today. Auiru^ M. trcwps of 
th** St^'ppi' fmrrt wItJi thr artJve 
rtwperatlon of thr flaok nf troopa 
of thf> \'orDnezh and Southwest 
fmntji hav^ broken the reatntaBr« 
of thf *-nr-my and taken by atomi 
thf town of Kharkov. 

■ Thus the secgnd ri\pltal of the 
rkrnini', nur o\<'n Kharkov, has 
N-.ii ftfX'd of the yok** of the Ger- 
man Ka.^rist sdiundrels- 

In the nff*»nsi\e l>altles for th« 

(Wipture .if The town of Kharkov. 

tiii troop\ have shown a hijfh 

^(ftndfirrt of hjittle tralnlnK. Vftlor 

j.nrt infint'uvciiibtlity.* 

\i Kharkov'!* capiuf* Ik also Impor- 

MftiW tM-(-nu8<^ it means the final 

»mHshltiB of the German "hedge 

■ hoK* line: Hzehv Orel. Kui^. 

\ 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 3] 

Exhibit (5 



fEOPLE^^irORL D 



AL RICHMOND BmowNv* Wditor 

ADAM LAPIN . .•••••••••. A9900UU9 Editor 

amNEY BURiOB ••.••■• a • &o« Angtlm Editor 

MARRT KRAMm «... BtMtMM M9na§0r 

MbtlslMtf tear («KMpt ■vadayt tad boB^agra) 
By th« PACnnC PUBLI8HINQ FOUNDATION. INC 
HWi Folsom SU 8«a Fr&n&tco 6; Pbon« EXbrook 3-1603 
306 8. Spring St. Loa Angelas 13; Phon* TRlnJty 1^64 

■inMCIUl^Oli IUTB»-By H«II A th* 0. B. •>« >«MnaowH 

WMk«^ IwiM OBly: 1 ir««r. ta.BO: e montba. n.M. . 

' BRjkJ«CB orflOKI * 

OAOuAND (13), 1733 W*Mt«r St. PbOB* TEmDlebv a-fl3Mk 
SAN DIKOO (1). 433 W SL, Roona S31. Phone UAia «t39 
lliATTUBJ4), ^3 TWfd Av«. Phon» IIA. Mi*. 
WA8HINQTON. D. C. Room »S4 Nattonal Praaa BoIUUbc. nwM (VAttonat 074T. 

§%b9crih9r to Vnittd f^rtsa, AUi^d Liibor N9%a», F9derat0d Prs 



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 19 



'Uodfafher' Dulles 

t I Editor, Daily People't World: 

B It Is evident that John Foster DuJlea was «rod 

(at th|^overnmenfa expense, of course) 

*'" J. W., Oakland. 




^^auding Lapin 

Editor, Daily Peopl&a World- 

R. J. Baker, Honololn. 



32 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 7 



R. /. tAKtlL. rROTOGRAPHBR. 

191 1 KiUkni ATcraac, 
Hooolola, 42 Ha»iii. 



Irtroai-r 1«. !»*' 




Tkla aekiio»l<4eM rvclpt at ycrur sot* of 
XaBSarT 24tli, with attaokM «ll)>pl!i« frm Joto BvBTOu«!i'» DUrr- 

I f*«l ma* that you do not ob]«ot to oar po«toffi«« tni Ball osnTlae 
faSlUtlM i«iloh oBTTT ordlnarr l«tt»ri to t»« ««< of cnr l«Bd for S* ana get 
th« th»« In a iruTTT >>y «lr «all for S« ud I do<*t tb«t rou «ould diMgrao If 
I Mid tkat 'fro* mtsmrla*" ■oald b* 111[*1t to akarg* fra» 25* to 50* for the 
•«■• aarrlo*. 

Our yobllo sakool (rctai ia at tlaa* ataaralr arltlaKadibat aoat paopl* 
aera* that •T«7ttila« eaBat««r«d It laaa a *«ad«rfaX ]<*• Tk* aorprla* ta.iiot 
that It ao«* ■«* «• k«M«>, tat »kc» U 4m* aa ««U. m It do**. I aa mrt ttiat 
yon know yonr ht*««rr *«H IW I * *o kaM ttMH tt« tiaaa of 9*or(* xuhlsctos 
paranta had to atnMrta tliatr e«i «klUT« <«)> <!■$■ HUv aoolt.iialiiA prlTate tutor*, 
^iTat* *eh3ol* and pri-nte eoUa(**.Tk* jnbll* Mkool *r*t«i <■» %ot r«t Mtab- 
llak«d>Tka nooaaslty for an aBlli^iBaA eltlaanrr aallal for bsttar and aor* 
aesaaaabl* aducatlonal fftsllltlaa,h<BO* th« ri*« of tha iMblK! aohool. 

flawninlat* ooBtma that both of th««« Inatltiitloau ar*, In aaaasoa, ooa- 
aialat ln»tltotlon«.Th«y ar* run without jroftt and for th« b«B«fit of all oltlitn* 
of our broad landjlo one wrrald want to ha»» than aboll*h*d or thatr aarrlcaa laea- 
«tad. W* aai than , why not axttBA thta jirlnalpl* to th* furalahlng of othar human 
aast*. KltSiiii fi»* hundred f*«t of ny hoa* ar* thr** grooary «tora*.B»8h haa It* 
building, Ita atook.lt* rafrlgarator and It freah T*eatobl*».There ara thr** barber 
ahojM within the aaai* dl*t«&e*.7hr** BiUaaao d*llT*r nlUc In Ky bloelc. 

Jt«b as «ntnt*lli8«Bt paraoo ana *** th* *a»t* asd dnplloation of *ffort 
and faellltloa InrolTad.Thaa* lllxi«tratl<«« eo^ad b* aaltlpllsd *8oraa of tlMs In 
*T«ry ooaawalty. W* bellffr* that Inatsad of allowing »»*ry ■•all buatoaa* peoraoa 
to charge ell the traffic will baar for aary n»ea**«ry ••meaa.thot eaoh ocwanmlty 
afaould har* it* it* ihouplwt oootar whar* •riOTthln* n*«d*d mot be jmrohaaed at 
oa«t. Such a aantar eoold b* plannad by the b«at arfihlt*ot*',aapla parking space 
could be proTld*d,and th* b*»t of arenrthlng ayallabl* that people eat.wear and 
use could be proTldad at ooat. 

Of oour** tho*e who profit by "fr** «nt*rprl*V" and who own or adTertlae li- 
the nawapepar* lanadlataly tall ua that auoh a plan would iKiadlataly fall; that it 
aoold raduo* araiybody to a ocoian l«T*l;that It would be laB07aI,lnd*cmt,*tc,*t<i. 
Th* old aatl-ooBRmlata axg<ai*Bta,yau Imow, 

it* al*o eontaa d that all th* greet lndu»trl»« ehould be run for the b«B«llt 
of all p«ople tnalaaj of tha fww oiai«ra;that aurrar* •hoold be mad* of our rasouroea 
and of the national s**a« •nd that th* tragi* waat* that raanlt* froa ooopatuiy* 
induatry should b* ellmlnotad. 

I ahall not go furtnar, since you may not be InterMtted anywiy,thar to flay 
that most people ar* now talking about the "n«xt dapreesloa." Depraaoltma or* an 
saiantlal part of "fr»* «atBrprl*e",but ar* oc«T>l»t»ly unneeaaaary un#«r a planned 
aooncny aueh as I hare suggsated. 

Aa for John &BrTough*ihe wa* a brilliant wrltar.an axoallent noturallat and 
a ««Tot** of the great out-of-door* ,H* was not a *oolologi»t or •conanlsta and taow 
nothing abouv ocaBOBlaB.'ni* quot*tlcn ahlah you hay* <Dolos*d ha* nothing wboterer 
to do with conmalitt. Ha wa* aa old nan when h* dl«d in 19S1. 



Slae*r«ly, 



Ray 



'"^^f'^l^rl^u/'Cc^, 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibits 



33 



PVhniary 23. 1950 



HONOLULU RECORD 
Koji Ariyoshi . . . Editor 

Published every Thursday by 

HO^.^■r'.:lL rkcord publishing co.. ltd. 

;'.il Slir;-„l.,u SIrect, Houol'iiu 14, T. K. 



Phone 96445 



a 







,/ 







'C/j/ 



34 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 



■■■r'i'"ii^;V < * »"•'' ■"''!% » f " 






C 



1 he Worker IVlamzme 



", m'.> t^ iiiiVii Vn tii 



t .fajL,,— «— ^.^ .t-t^ 



^ 



S 0« D A y 



(iCBRCASir 2fe, l»S« 



» k t, T I O H jt 




741^ 4^-:; ^0^ 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 10 



35 



Page Four 



HONOLULU RECORD 



Thursday, Nov. 11, 1948 




rm wi 4nty t«il«1it." 



36 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 11 



PEOPLE'S^WOEL B 

K^i^cnnvc Krtnor 

, A3S0i--itrc i:.jMor 

I/OB AtiK'^lf-? Ka;'«:>r 

. aiislnea^ Man -x^i^ 

V ft x;-'pf P'-.udays and noHrtnysi 
Pr H ! \ SH ING KOU ND\TIO>. S. i NO. 
Kianc-!*.-ti 5; Phone KXbrncn; i-in>fa 

Weuktna it.-*ue oniy. I year. Vi'Ji: ft wiooiha. 11-50, 
BRANCH OKFICKS 
OAKI ', .vi> MCI, !7J:j WVt*»ter SU Phone TKmpler«c 'i 52««. 
Ht- ; .■(■■■■ .i; <lv - ;:• F c!t.. Room 1.21. Thone M&io ^^-^ 
t;. ■ "i i r ■', .-""ij '1 i,)rf1 Avp. Phonp MA. 3744. 
VS/. .-; :< ■^- J' ■', Room P.'»4 Netionai Press Buiiair^ 





•ND .. 

1 -^ . . . 

i:iCK . 







HO ! 



-•', ^aif-d iJ/k-ooT HcwB 



SATURDAY, MARCH 13, 1948 




"I tell you, I JHst can't make up my mind — Trumaii, Tafti 
Dewey, Ma<'Arthur. . , . " 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 12 



37 



September 9, 1948 



THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Koji Ariyoshi . . . Editor 

Published ewiy Tliursday at 
811 Sbertdan St.. Honolulu 

Phone 96445 

SCBSCRfPTlON RAXES: 



1 ywr (Oaho) _ 

1 year lOther Mands) . . . . 

—Includes AirmaUiiig- 
1 Tear (Mainland) - 



SS.M 

S«.09 




'Wflt. YOU EVeff BE A MBMBeffOfi 
THE COMMUNIST PARTY f" 



38 



REPORT ON THE HONOLULU RECORD 
Exhibit 13 



Bmly Worker 



pttvuSHtD oAtiy otoept sywDJiTr vt xai ■ 

FREEDOM or THt IPHCSB CO., INC.. C6 Eol | 
Itm «t, '■*•» Yvrk a. N. Y. relevant At.t«Mt>la{ 
4.7te4. C»kt« A4*-oi' "Oai-rsrlf." ««» tflrt, M. 
0Bvi«* Jr.; Secretarx-Tr0ai. — Bewardt BoMi; 

««..—...».....,.^».-. .__.-. ^Moctotff Editor 
Managing Editor 



CONGRESSMAN DPIPP 



l*r««ufem— Benjamin $. 

MonH Childs 

Mtlboa llowsrd .«.,.„ 

Alaa Max .!_—.——__„,„„««__«_»_««____, 

Rob F. HaU Washington Editor 

Bill Lawretic« ,.■ — . . . Cenerai Mmta^er 

BOBSCRIPTIOM RATES 
(ttupt MMtwtttn. %rtm*. C»Ma W*A Farc(|n> t Msntm 

BAVLV WORKEft tnd THE WOllKrfi fS 7S 

8AII.V WCBKtU J » S.M 

r«e woffMER . . _„ 

dAItT WOBKCK urf THC WORRER ,..,., ... U.M 

BAUywOflKEB 1^ 

rue VBRKCR — 



« MMtht 


1 yctf 


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«IM tet i« Ihnft I, f«7B. 



1*41, M Um P«U Onn M IIR V««. «. V. w4« 



N«w York, Frldar, April 25, 1947 



By YOMEN 




'lers BAH STRIKES, PICKBTUNES.CLOSEP SHOPS 
AHD AIAHB UNION MEN PAY DUiS TO TH£ COfmut* 



o 




BOSTON PUBLIC LIRRarv 

3 liiBiiiiL. 

3 9999 05445 2097 



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